What causes déjà vu? Scientists may have the answer

I'm having one now!

Most of us have had that uncanny feeling of a new situation seeming so familiar, it seems as if it’s already happened. But what is this all about?  A clinical psychologist explains…

What is déjà vu?

Déjà vu is a French term that translates to “already seen” in English. 

What is the cause of déjà vu?

Although the exact cause of déjà vu remains somewhat enigmatic, several theories have been proposed to explain it…

Some suggest it may be linked to how memories are processed in the brain, potentially involving delays or errors in memory retrievals…

Fun Fact: Some 60% to 70% of people in good health experience some form of déjà vu during their lifetime. 

Other theories suggest it might result from the brain processing information through multiple pathways simultaneously…

Another intriguing theory involves the idea of memories stored in a complex, interconnected manner in the brain…

Regardless of the precise mechanism, déjà vu is a transient and common experience that lasts only briefly, affecting people of all ages and not considered a pathological condition…

Who experiences déjà vu?

Some 60% to 70% of people in good health experience some form of déjà vu during their lifetime, according to WebMD. 

“A familiar sight or sound can trigger the feeling,” the same source noted. “You may walk into a room in a building you’ve never visited yet feel like you know it intimately.”

Interestingly, déjà vu is more likely to happen to people between the ages of 15 and 25, according to Health.com. 

“People with more education, those who travel a lot, and people who can recall their dreams are also more likely to experience déjà vu.”